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, and we saw a column earlier today from a senior member of the american foreign policy council and he's suggesting that the u.s. is less popular in the middle east now than it was at the end of president george w. bush's administration. let's debate that, bring in alan colmes, the host of the alan colmes show and ben ferguson, the most of the ben ferguson show. >> hi. >> alisyn: alan, what do you think of that premise. did candidate obama said he would help to elevate our status internationally after what he believed president bush had done and that our stature was no longer as high. do you think president obama has accomplished that? >> i do and i spent time looking at the polls and our standing worldwide and particularly in the muslim world is a little higher than at the end of the bush administration. one of the problems we have is the anti-islamic video that came out about a year ago and hurt us in pakistan and hurt us in many parts of the middle east and we also were hurt in pakistan by doing something which most of us applauded, going in and getting bin laden. so there are certa
me, joe, is that acceptable foreign policy in your mind? >> sean, look the prime minister of israel and bill clinton met at camp david with-- >> was he a terrorist. >> you can't do-- it doesn't matter whether he was or not. you have to deal with-- if you're going to have peace you have to work with both parties. you don't have to like both parties, but. >> sean: cover up the cross, but speak under a picture of arafat. >> we were meeting with abbas' on their turf, in their presidential arena and you come-- if you come to the white house, if you come to the white house and meet with our president and you don't like the fact that george washington is sitting over a desk-- >> george washington isn't a terrorist. and wait, i have a question. >> the british probably thought he was. >> sean: was he a terrorist? >> of course he was. >> sean: thank you, thank you. but the british probably thought that george washington was a terrorist. >> sean: if i was president, billy cunningham, i wouldn't speak under a picture of a terrorist. >> sean hannity we wondered what a second jimmy carter term wo
neighbor. xi jinping's neighbor shares a border with russia. common views on foreign policy and thriving trade ties. it's the first stop on the chinese president's nine-day diplomatic tour. xi jinping arrived in moscow to an official welcoming. his wife accompanied him. she's a well-known military singer. president xi is scheduled to hold a news conference on friday evening after meeting russian president vladimir putin. during his three-day stay, he will visit the russian defense ministry and will meet students learning the chinese language. president xi will then fly to africa. he's visiting tanzania and the republic of congo. he'll also attend a summit in south africa of five emerging economies known as brics. brazil, russia, india, china and south africa. >>> russia has turned down an appeal for aid by cyprus leaving banks on the island country in deep financial trouble. cyprus sent its finance minister michael air isous to moscow to seek help from russia. many wealthy companies and people keep their money in russia because of preferential tax treatment. two days of talks ended up wi
on foreign relations and author of "foreign policy begins at home." richard, thank you for joining me. although it seems to have been a successful trip for relations with israel has it done much to nudge the peace process forward? >> it's in some ways set the foundation or provided a context. i've been a diplomat before and there are times you can do peace plans, times situationes are right for specific proposals. this is not one of them. this was a trip to go over the head of the israeli government, to build a context of support. once that context exists then it makes it less date for the israeli government to dom to a negotiating table and put kids forward. the same logic applies to the palestinian side. this is a pre-negotiating trip. >> do you think he comes back with the stage set where he's prepared to invest his own political capital and get the peace process going? >> i think it's probably too oon to get that decision but great deal and turkey, was brought around with concerns about iran, the fear of syria. now you've had a rejew -- renewed strategic alignment between those tw
by the other, right? how did ambassador rod minnesota's complete lack of foreign policy knowledge not come out in the confirmation hearing? i don't know. let's get a simple moment, maybe something about the family. >> matt and craig live close to an open space area. we throw the balls to the dogs. we play sports with the kids. they lick kick balls, hitting baseballs. we do what grandparents are expected to do with grand kids. >> jon: do you see why you snroft i'm not suggest you don't have a wonderful and warm relationship with your family and grandchildren in these open space areas -- [laughter] -- but you need to understand that we humans -- [laughter] -- we call them parks. [ laughter ] you can't describe them as "open space areas" and expect to win elections because humans tend to vote for other humans. but in the end, sunday morning's epic battle to misconstrue basic human relationships to had to go to dennis rodman who had one form for the one family dictatorship. >> one thing i noticed about him he was very humble as a kid he's very humble. [laughter] >> jon: yes, the 28-year-old who co
'hanlon director of research and a senior of foreign policy fellow at the brookings institution. >> thank you. >> that sound that we played for the president's speech today, is what we heard a fair response to the criticism that the president hasn't acted aggressively enough? >> well it's a very fair way of looking at the theory. in theory any military operation sound appealing when you're frustrated by what you're watching and you want to make a difference. the president is certainly right to remember that when you get involved, you know, it's hard to get out and even if you start providing arms to the rebels, you implicate yourself in a way that it mayes in estate escalation. i agree that we should be arming the rebels and i consider nato arab league and combined air strikes in support of it, but i understand the president's reluctance so far. i think it's about time, though, we re-assess. you've written extensively on military options for syria. is it your view that the united states should enact an air operation? because one of assad's greatest advantages over the rebels, as you know, is
't agree on everything -- >> anything. i believe that diplomacy should be the cornerstone of any foreign policy. >> and i can see russia from my house! >> seems like yesterday when you watch that, but it's been four and a half years since tina fey introduced her stunning impression of sarah palin on "saturday night live." and just when tina fey fans thought they had seen the last of that palin impression, one man, the only man who could do this, was able to get her to do it once again tuesday night. >> would you allow me to introduce sarah palin, please? >> we could try. >> i'm the one taking the chance, not you, pal. you asked joe biden if you could call him "joe." >> uh-huh. >> shall i address you as governor? you served only half a term, so what's the right term of address? >> well, i'll tell ya, i don't know. and i'm a half governor or you could call me a maverick at large. >> perhaps gov. >> gov would be fine by me too. >> i know that you're very fond of shooting wolves from a helicopter. which is understandable enough. have your views on gun laws or wolves changed at all? >> you kn
by hillary lever vitt, professor of american foreign policy. she specialized in affairs at the state department during the clinton and bush administrations and joined by matt center for american progress. seems like i just spoke to you last night. tell us what this speech means. does this mean the administration is willing to put forth a serious effort towards brokering peace in the middle east and specifically between israelis and palestinians or is this a tremendous speech that doesn't have the substance necessary to carry forth? >> i think it is a speech that underscores obama's speech in rhetoric. unfortunately i don't think it was tremendous in substance. the key aspects what's really necessary for a two state solution, halt to settlements, that was completely dropped from obama's prior substance filled speeches. unfortunately this plan or idea isn't going anywhere. >> why did he drop it? didn't want to insult the israelis to their face? didn't want to challenge them that toughly? >> i think the whole trip was not to make peace in the middle east to make peace with congress at h
been boors, the director of foreign policy at the brookings. the president going around the government and right to the young people of israel. >> it was an amazing speech he game yesterday in jerusalem, in which he spoke to 2,000 young israelis about the importance of israel to the united states, and made a very clear statement that israel would never be -- he explained his commitment to israeli security but went on to make an impassioned play for peacemaking and around the leadership in israel to say to the young people, it's time for you to push your leadership to take risks. >> this is a man with a 10% approval rating, which i'm guessing just went up. but at the same time, these israelis are dealing with harsh realities of walls on every border, an impossible long-term situation, and a realizeways that without peace, long term, not good. >> that's exactly the argument. then he went on to do something today which was somewhat of a breakthrough in terms of relations between turkey and israel. he managed to broker an apology from prime minister benjamin netanyahu to the prime minister
that he exported to sudan. >> what is remarkable to me is the fact that the conservative foreign policy establishment, almost in toto, continues to defend the decision to go to war, there has been no big mea culpas. but the core group, dan senor, bill crystal, wolfowitz, all of those people, none of them have come clean and said, look, what we did was wrong. >> and i think it's important, a lot of democrats didn't call him on it and i think that's why they got away. i remember when i ran for president in 2004, i was controversial at the convention because i attacked bush and everyone said don't do that. chris hayes, thank you for your time tonight and congratulations on your move to 8:00 p.m. >> it's going to be fun. >> and watch "hubris" here on msnbc at 9:00 p.m. eastern tonight, followed by "talking hubris" with chris hayes. [ female announcer ] switch to swiffer wetjet, and you'll dump your old mop. but don't worry, he'll find someone else. ♪ who's that lady? ♪ who's that lady? ♪ sexy lady ♪ who's that lady? [ female announcer ] used mops can grow bacteria. swiffer wetjet st
is for a generation republicans dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. and on foreign policy, they did not support the bush foreign policy, so the issues that made that republican party dominant, all three issues are in democratic favor. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter what network you have. economic conservatives and smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better databases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you look at t
. not to apologize for their role in arguably the worst foreign policy disaster and deception in a century, but to say actually it wasn't a disaster or a decepti deception, it was a great idea and they're not sorry and everything worked out great. >> you try to do everything you can diplomatically, without resort to force, but our history is replete with examples where ultimately we had to use force. >> and the argument this was a war you wanted? >> wanted? why, because we like war? i did what i did. it's all on the public record. and i feel very good about it. if i had to do it over again, i would do it in a minute. >> i feel very good about it. what's there to feel bad about? one of dick cheney's main cohorts in selling the iraq war to the american people was this guy, deputy defense secretary paul wolfowits, her was his contribution to the discussion this
: joining me martin indyk, director of foreign policy brookings institution, also a former u.s. ambassador to israel. and itamar rabinovich served as israel ambassador to the united states. at the same time he was chief negotiator with the syrian government and president and founder of the israeli institute. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table, at this time, when the president i saying some very interesting things in israel. so welcome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: characterize this speech by the president. >> this speech was typical obama at his best, working his oratorical magic on a crowd that lapped it up. he spoke very convincingly about his commitment to israel's security and his understanding of their security dilemmas. and particularly underlined what he was going to prevent iran from getting nuclear weaponsment buthen he went into a rif about peace and the necessity of peace and the possibility of peace, and why peace has to be just, even saying put yourself, you israelis put yourself in the shoes of the palestinians. and talked over the heads of the leadership
funding. the same way democrats have often done on some foreign policy issues in the past with a republican president. stop the money is how you stop the law. but i think it's going to be a you have tough thing to do. it's, again, once the program gets in place, it's hard to take it back. and one of these things the governors have done when they let the federal government set up the system is that takes the states out of having any ability to set up the exchange themself. i mean, it gives the state less say and the federal government more say. that's going to be a tough thing for the republicans. you know, republicans want more say in the states. so even in times of posing obamacare, they're actually giving more power to the federal government. it's very complicated issue. of. jon: well, it is complicated, and it's three years old, and most of its provisions really haven't kicked in yet. that's what remains to be seen, how, you know, people adjust to it as they actually have to sign on for this thing. joe trippi -- >> that's right. jon: -- we'll continue to keep a watch on
foundation and asian studies center. when we started it 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back and asian security was all about what was happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, the study of the soviet union might have made more sense. to as we talked, we talked about the potential it could be conceivable u.s. trade with asia with equal trade across the atlantic. today it is much several times greater than that we have them blessed that over the years we have seen their remarkable economic growth and development. it is our pleasure to recognize that in terms of economic freedom as it has evolved throughout asia and pacific countries and indeed throughout the region. wheel is new our good and friends in japan and that a mutual relationship, the mutual defense treaty would be central. but we also thought asia deserved fully of broader treatment in its own right so we invested in the future. as we look ahead but those in the range of foreign and strategic and economic policy issues coming today it is hard to distinguish one fro
to be realistic. the young people who are there and who applauded ally will not be shaping foreign policy and we have to deal with the government that exists. it's a coalition government of really intense contradictions and we, therefore, have to be very clear in asserting what we consider to be the vital interests of the united states which are automatically good for israel. because if the united states is healthy and strong and predominant in the region, israel is totally secure. let's not forget, sdentally something very important which the press hasn't played up at all in recent months but yet it is a very telling fact. israel and the united states tend to be almost completely isolated in the middle east. not only in terms of the middle eastern countries but in terms of world opinion. look at the vote in the u.n. when we made every single effort possible to discourage countries from voting in favor of palestinian membership in the u.n. how many votes out of 190, out of 190 did we get? we found only seven countries to support us. this tells us something. and, therefore, we have to be very, ve
politics than with foreign-policy. but there is this session it will never happen, but it could happen. to protect israel in a credible fashion, if we wish, by guarantees which are as binding or or more binding than those we get to the europeans and those to the japanese and south koreans. and this is a country which does not have the opportunity to threaten us directly. at the same time, we should not lose sight that if we do repeat iran, what we did vis-À-vis iraq, we will probably engaged in a conflict that is more protracted and more regionally widespread than was the case with iraq a decade ago? so these are some of the concerns from history. let me make one more observation about the nature of war. toker sees are very able wage total war if they are attacked. they are not so good. they're not read this post. they are mentally not prepared to wage total war if they started they were themselves but were not attacked. difference.ortant we were able to break the will of the germans in large measure by massive air assaults on their civilian population. yes, of course, it was justifie
. >> or foreign policy. >> spoiler alert, we got bin laden. >> i have an announcement to make. >> reporter: it's become a desperate quest to avoid the dreaded spoiler. things have got on it a point where you can't say much of anything for fear of spoiling something for the people around you. but does the fault lie with the spoiler or the spoilee? >> if you care enough about a show that it would bother you to be spoiled, then watch the show when it airs, and if you can't watch the show, then it's incumbent upon you to stay off twitter, stay off the internet and don't talk to your friends who watch the show. >> reporter: another spoiler rule? respect the statute of limitations. >> you can't say omar got killed on "the wire" because someone will say oh, i just started the dvds and i'm on season three and i can't believe did you that to me. that show was on in like 2002. >> reporter: at some point, big and small screen civil society expects to you know that rosebud is a sled, the kid sees dead people and kristen shot j.r. and spoiler alert, matthew, hurry up. >> i can't watch it again. no. >> the
right here. >> ticket. -- thank you. since the president is taking his first foreign trip to the middle east, how do you see his policy and can he achieve something in his second term? >> i'm hoping to keep the focus on the big question before us, which is the lessons of a decade of war. general that the mentioned how war does not often turn out the way you want it to, as the air battle concept would be too much towards. how owards that direction, did that shift resources away from europe and asia in the 2000's? >> you said regarding one of the, with in history, 3 packets of a regime but they were doing this for 3 decades. it's only in the end that the u.s. learned of weapons. the regime was brutal all the time. >> we have the whole world on a table. onhow has our expenditures iraq affected our ability to operate elsewhere? the united states is the number one superpower. we have the largest economy. so we manage to remain engaged in other parts of the world. but that does not refer to the proposition that the war iraq was excessively expensive, not only morally but financially and physi
about it, foreign aid -- we never talk about it, foreign aid, our foreign policy hasn't been reauthorized for years. there hasn't been a full-time inspector general in the state department in six years. we have seven open spots for inspector generals to actually look at this stuff and to advise us and advise the agencies. so we're failing to do our job. and my only wish of my colleagues is to get informed, and if you're on a committee, you don't have to solve it the way i'd solve it, but just solve it. it makes no sense to continue to duplicate things. as a matter of fact, in job training, here's what g.a.o. said. of the 47 job training programs for nondisabled people -- we have another 53 for the disabled. of the 47, all but three do exactly the same thing. all right? so either g.a.o. is lying or they're not. if they're not lying, why wouldn't we in the next two months in this place fix those programs, to make them where they're actually giving real skills that will give a real livelihood to people who need real job training? no effort at all to do that. the house just passe
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)